Category Archives: Dinner

Worth Every Cent

If you’ve followed me on Instagram, you’d realise that I tried to subconsciously influence you to go for the Ramadhan buffet at a quaint place in the vicinity of Arab St lol. This time, I’m gonna be more blatant about it.

So, about 4 days ago, was the usual weekday Iftar date with my favourite fireboy. I have been aching to get my hands on some decent Nasi Sambal Goreng from Kandahar St; only to be greeted by a zombietown of a bazaar. Yup, serves me right for choosing to go on a Wednesday evening.

Dragged my feet browsing through a few open ones like this busy mini-vadai stall

and

my yearly must-have lemang fix stall (yesssssahh!).

My Nasi Sambal Goreng disappointment was short-lived when we aimlessly walked through Bussorah Street and discovered a much better deal at Bushra Cafe.

One that costed $9.50.

For less than ten bucks each, we got to choose a main dish from a choice of 10 types of Fried Rice or Noodles and a filled-to-the-brim table buffet of fresh greens, hot finger snacks, traditional Malay kuehs, tantalising dessert, ice-cream and a free-flow of hot and cold drinks. I’ll be quick to defend that the choices weren’t plenty, but the food tasted exactly as they looked.

Authentic and spot-on quality.

Costed a little more than the intended simple fix, but the food was a whole lot more than what my stomach had expected.

Some days later, my fellow Instagrammer friend @_raz decided to give this place a try. I swear I almost died from the responsibility I felt for recommending the place but this is what she had to say (taken off her IG):

“…I was so full till I got no room for ice-cream. Food was nice.. I love the kuih-kuihs the best! Worth every cent!..”

With slightly more than a week left of Ramadhan, this entry may come a little late but it’s definitely worth your every cent. Besides, this majestic beauty welcomes you for some heart & soul indulgence right after, only 20 steps away.

Bushra Cafe

Ramadhan Buffet: $9.5o/adult and $6.00/child

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Filed under Dinner, Iftar Venue, Uncategorized

Soaked

One of the reasons how Countless Plates came to being was because there aren’t many sources for traditional Malay recipes online. I’m an avid foodblog reader and though it’s easy to google French and Italian fare, it just doesn’t make any sense to perpetually feed my family (with sambal belacan & petai palate) lasagnes, aglio olios, pizzas, stews and raviolis right?

Well, here’s a dish that I guess everyone with the same traditional taste can relate to: Nasi Rawon.

Each time I prepare this dish at home, I always see beaming faces eager to dig in. Yes, albeit at 5am. Why?

Steaming hot white rice – check!

Warm Rawon gravy – check!

Empeng Bilis – check!

Serunding – check!

Sambal Belacan – check!

Nasi Rawon has every element to appease almost every Melayu palate lol. It looks pretty straightforward but oh boy, the preparation is lengthy. But if it makes my family happy, it’s gotta be worth it!

Let’s begin with the basic Rawon gravy. This recipe makes a huge pot, and might I add, the flavours get more intense after about 2-3 days of reheating. So it’d be a great idea to save half the pot in the freezer for later.

For Broth:

1/2kg Beef Tripe

1/2kg Beef Brisket

2 litres Water

2 inch Ginger

1 large Onion

2 tsp Salt

For sautéeing:

3 tbsp Coriander Seeds

1 1/2 tbsp Fennel Seeds

1 tbsp Black Peppercorns

10 Shallots

2 Red onions

1 handful Buah Keluak meat

6 tbsp dried Chilli Paste

2 stalks Lemongrass

3 inch Galangal

4 Salam Leaves

4 Kaffir Lime Leaves

1 or 2 Dried Tamarind Sheets

In a huge pot, boil all the ingredients for the broth, till the meats are tender.

As for the sautéed spices, the procedure is similar to Ayam Korma’ – Toast and grind the coriander, fennel and black pepper seeds. Shallots, onions, buah keluak and dried chilli paste goes into the blender to form a smooth paste. You can toss your ground spices in as well.

Heat oil in a flat pan and pour the paste in. Be extra careful – it might splatter (most of the time it does). This process will take between 30-45 minutes. I’m risking sounding like a broken record but repeat after me, ensure that you see the oil seeping through the spices (naik bau/terbit minyak). Pound the lemongrass and galangal, loosely tear salam, kaffir lime leaves and tamarind sheets; they too, join the spicefest in the pan.

Keep the heat on. The aroma will intensify and most of the time, it makes me go a little weak in the knees! Pour all of your pan’s contents into the pot of broth. Stir and let it simmer for under an hour, and then you’re good to go!

Serve this Indonesian beef stew with some hot white rice.

Personally, I like my rice soaked in all that glorious goodness for a couple of minutes before lapping it up with all the sides that were mentioned in the checklist above. It goes well too, with a range of other sinful sides; from Fried Tempeh (fermented soy beans), Bagedil (mashed potatoes with spring onions and beef), Paru (beef lung) to Sambal Sotong (cured squid in chilli paste).

And just cos Ramadhan is partly about sharing, I’ll be a little generous with the recipe-sharing. I’m sure you’ve noticed the Empeng Bilis at the side?

Here are the few ingredients that go into it:

200g Silverfish*

4 chopped Garlic Cloves

2 thinly-sliced Large Onions

2 tbsp chopped Spring Onions

1 tbsp Dried Chilli Flakes

2 sliced Green Chillies

1 beaten Egg

3/4 cup Fritter Flour**

Water

*Silverfish are available in the supermarket’s fresh clingwrapped section. You know the refrigerated sections where the salmon are? Silverfish are slightly meatier than the usual anchovy and less salty too.

** I use Adabi’s Tepung Goreng Pisang for this but any kind of fritter flour is fine. Shortcut alert: If you don’t have it, use the same amount of plain flour and rice flour with 1/2 tsp of bicarbonate of soda.

Mix all the ingredients in a bowl. Add just enough water so the mixture combines. Too much moisture will cause the fritters to be a little flat and it’ll splatter in the oil. Heat your pan with oil, and fry a tablespoon of batter each. Ensure your oil’s hot enough or the Empeng Bilis will end up soggy. Not pretty!

I made Nasi Rawon for Sahur as my family’s the kind that can’t get our engines revved up the next day without rice in our tummies. But I do have friends who do the opposite (have their rice meals during Iftar), so whatever rocks your boat really. Enjoy, lovelies! =)

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Filed under Dinner, Lunch, Recipes, Sahur Recipe

Parchment-baked Pasta

If there’s any staple food that deserves the title of Most Versatile, it would be pasta. C’mon, pasta types count to the hundreds and pasta dishes in the thousands. In fact, did you know that in the 1800, there are already 260 types of pasta? 211 years later, imagine the pasta population!

Whether it be sautéed, or in a soup, or served with stew, or baked in a tray, or fried in a frittata; one thing remains – it’s an all-time favourite that’s here to stay for another century. I’m an ardent fan of quick-fix pasta recipes, because when I crave for it, I just wanna whip it up in a jiffy to hush the aching crave.

That said, here’s a fuss-free, cook-while-you’re-busy-with-chores recipe that I’d like to share: Parchment-baked Linguine with Prawns.

This one serves 2 (or 1 of me), so do increase the proportions of you’re cooking for more:

Linguine

Salt & Black Pepper

1 tbsp Butter

1/2 diced Yellow Onion

4 crushed Garlic Cloves

10 shelled Prawns

1/4 cup Pasta Water*

1 tbsp dried Italian Herbs

1/2 cup canned Mushroom Soup mix

1 tsp grated Parmesan Cheese

1 tsp dried Oregano leaves

1) Bring a pot of liberally salt-&-peppered water to a boil and cook the linguine to al dente. Drain it and add a dollop of butter and toss it about to coat each strand.

Here are a few simple good-to-know tips about boiling pasta:

Bring the water to a rolling boil before sliding in the linguine. Putting it in while the water is still cold results in al dente cooked pasta on the outer layer, whereas the centre of the pasta is solid white. By the time you wait for the whole string to cook, the outer layer would have already been mush.

For string pastas, hold the bunch in the middle of your pot before letting them all disperse into the water. This ensures that it does not clump. If it does clump, just use a fork and swirl about in the water. Easy peasy!

Salting the water liberally adds taste to the otherwise bland linguine. Also, after draining your al dente pasta, keep aside about a cup or less of the pasta water* to thin your sauce. There’s really no magic in it; it had been claimed to thicken or add flavour to your sauce of choice but plainly put, it’s just handy to have rather than fetching a cup from your kettle.

2) In a cup, mix the italian herbs, mushroom soup mix and parmesan cheese with pasta water. Once it thickens, tumble the prawns, garlic and onion in the concoction. You might want to substitute prawns with calamari rings or cubed chicken, or all of it if you’d like. It’s really a one-size-fits-all type of recipe!

3) Lay a tray with parchment paper (also known as baking sheet). Plonk your pile of linguine and top it off with the marinated prawns and dust some dried oregano over it. Now, wrap the dish in the parchment paper like a tootsie roll. The aim is to ensure that they get maximum coverage, without having the insides unglamorously spilling out in the oven.

4) Bake it in the oven at 220°C for 15-20 minutes. Take extra care while eagerly opening up the sheet and take a whiff of all that goodness! Like a steam facial, only better. What cooking in the oven under wraps actually does is, it creates a sauna-like environment; you could say you have steamed’ your pasta dish, melted the onions and garlic down, whilst having all the wonderful flavours absorbed fully into the linguine. It works the same if you’d like to experiment with marinara sauce and with other pasta types.

5) Give it a little toss, and serve it hot. Quick, easy, and yet oddly satisfying!


This one’s perfect for lazy Sunday afternoons, or you could bookmark it as an iftar menu in the month of Ramadhan. Just pop it in the oven say, about 30 minutes before azan and voila, ready for chow down!

This post was written for Muzlimbuzz (Travel&Food):

Ramadan Recipe: Parchment-baked Linguine 

Muzlimbuzz is an e-magazine that caters to the modern, active, socially-engaged and spiritual Muslim. We aim to document and articulate the Muslim experience, particularly of those in Singapore and in the region.Apart from News and opinion pieces, we have daily columns that cover a wide array of topics from Health to Marriage, Spirituality to Technology, Travel & Photo Essays. In a nutshell, there’s bound to be something that would interest you here at Muzlimbuzz.

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Filed under Dinner, Iftar Recipe, Lunch, Muzlimbuzz, Recipes, Tips

Carnivore’s Dream

It all started with a Whatsapp message from my mister some weeks ago, it read:

“BBBBBB, CHECK OUT MEATWORKS! OMG WE HAVE TO GO TRY IT PLS. LOOK AT THE MENU ON THEIR SITE!”

Yes, in caps, no less.

My almost immediate reaction after checking out their menu? The carnivore in me exclaimed “What time do they close tonight?

Wanna know why?

Let me just begin with delectable starters served at MeatWorks.

Beef Carpaccio

This starter is cleverly-crafted to combine the fresh flavours of greens and mushrooms, sitting pretty on finely-sliced tenderloin, drizzled with wasabi emulsion and sparingly topped with shaved gran padano.

Definitely a yes-please as an appetiser.

I personally love having a little of everything on my fork!

Avocado & Mushroom Salad

I’ve always fancied the creamy texture of avocado in salads, so quite naturally, this one appeased my palate.

It resembled the yu sheng (Teochew-style raw fish salad served during Chinese New Year); only this platter was filled with greens, sundried tomatoes, fresh tomatoes, mushrooms and avocado; finished off with a slight tang of vinaigrette.

My mister has a hate-hate relationship with greens so these 2 starters were 90% mine! So there I was, grazing like a cow before I got the cow on my plate lol! Ok, now let’s move on to the real deal.

MeatWorks Burger

If you, like me, enjoy watching American or British cooking shows on tv, you’d have watched chef after chef preparing a homemade patty with ground meat and spices, leaving you salivating for one right after.

The MeatWorks burger is exactly that.

Humongous grilled succulent beef patty, topped with fresh salad and finished generously with mayonnaise-based dressing. And you have got to believe me, the patty was the size of my hand! I had mine with foccacia, but you can choose what you’d like the patty to be sandwiched in.

Hanging Tender

So I’ve read that this cut of beef comes from the cow’s diaphragm and is not conventionally served as a dish or main course; but I applaud MeatWorks for taking the road less travelled. The dish embodies its name and is truly tender to the mighty carnivore’s bite.

We had ordered it well-done (I’ve got a bad case of bloodophobia hehe), and to my amazement, it was neither dry nor tough which was usually the case if you insisted your meat well-done.

This one’s a definite timeless classic of deliciousness.

Wagyu D Rump

Drumroll please while I introduce my favourite main course to date (I say to date, because without a doubt, I will sit on those red seats again & diggin in on a Bronto.) Wagyu, the tenderest of steaks, owes its form to the marbling of the meat. According to Steve (our well-informed & thoughtful waiter), the cows were fed the finest of grains and basically had a great life before they became steak.

As the plate descends on the table before me, I could already steal whiffs of char-grilled goodness!

Oh gosh, the steak was a gorgeous mass of latticed brown crust with a slight glisten of pink that lies beneath.

The phenomenal piece of meat on my plate was a breeze to cut due to its delicate marbled pink structure and it being succulent with aromatic juices.

Well done indeed.

I had mine accompanied with Bearnaise sauce (sans any traces of wine) and what a pair they were! If I go on to describe the Wagyu D Rump, I could well use some expletives to tell you just how &%$!-ing good it was.

Just try it, you’ll thank me later!

Now, what’s a happy meal without sweet treats?

Desserts

Twice, my Mister had the Tiramisu.

The first time was fate, I’d say, having had the waitress come to us twice saying that his dessert choices were unavailable. But now, I’m pretty certain that it’s his ultimate choice at MeatWorks.

The little shot of Tiramisu, had the right balance of sweet, creamy and coffee decadence.

Having always enjoyed crème brulee, there was no question what I was going to order after catching a glimpse at the dessert menu. And this one, peeeeerfect. Just the right amount of not-too-sweet but oh-so-creamy custard, under a veneer of crystallised caramel which glimmered under the chandeliers.


Oh gawd, this was heaven, I thought.

Downside though, frankly, who was I kidding – one ramekin is enough for a crème brulee fan like me? I’d have 6 if I had my way!

Mocktails and Smoothies

With quirky names like C&M, Cape Sunrise, L&P and Very Berry, I know that you’d be quite skeptical to even pick any. But really, their mocktails and smoothies rocked my socks! If I had to pick one though, it’d be the C&M Smoothie, over and over again. I’ll give you 4 reasons why – Caramel, Macadamia, Orange juice and Yoghurt.

Enough reasons?

MeatWorks is perfect for special occasions, like anniversaries or birthdays, or days when you think Hey I’ve done great for myself and I deserve a treat! And my sincerest thanks to Ms Wahida from MeatWorks@ION Orchard for listening to our beef-starved voices and for making our dining experience simply flawless.

Till my next Brontosaurus Steak indulgence,

xoxo T-Rex

MeatWorks Restaurant

#04-12, 27 to 32, ION Orchard, 2 Orchard Turn

Ramadhan buffet: $38++/adult & $19++/child

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Filed under Desserts, Dinner, Favourites, Iftar Venue

Familiar Flavour

As a child, my brother and I frequented our granny’s place when both our parents headed off to their 9-to-5. Lunch & dinner were usually prepared lovingly by her and she never failed to note our favourites, cook them and watch us both lap up our plates with glee.

Apart from the simple but satisfying combination of rice-butter-sunny-side up-&-dark-soy-sauce (Still my ultimate fave!), I fondly remember her preparing Ayam Korma’ at least twice a week, because it was a familiar flavour that topped my favourites list. I was already a foodie back when I was 7 lol!

Now, each time I prepare this dish, my mind forms a vivid recollection of her feeding me amid my rambling about events in school. Oh alright, sentimental memories and granny stories aside; here are the ingredients you’ll need for Ayam Korma’ as prepared by the wise ole lady herself – I have em all at my fingertips cos it’s a household staple!

For Spices mix:

3 tsp Coriander Seeds

1 1/2 tsp Fennel Seeds

1 tsp White Peppercorn

1/2 Nutmeg

1 tbsp Korma’ spice powder

4 cloves Garlic (blend)

2 large Red Onions (blend)

2 stalks Lemongrass

1 inch Galangal

2 Kaffir Lime Leaves

1 Whole Chicken

1 cup (or less) Coconut Milk

For Garnish:

Coriander Leaves

Fried Shallots

Toast the 4 spices in a pan over a medium heat, to intensify the aroma. Roll them around so they don’t get burnt.

Here are some quick tips on dried spices:

When you’re cooking with spices like cumin, coriander seeds, fennel seeds and the likes, get the right proportions. Under-adding spices will result in a less aromatic dish, yet over-adding spices will overpower other ingredients and may even cause the dish to be bitter! Yikes!

Toasting spices helps to release their aroma. It is however, important to not burn it. Burning your spices too will result in a bitter dish, so do keep it under close watch.

In a mortar, grind the toasted spices with Korma’ spice powder. Once it’s well-grounded, mix it to the blended garlic cloves and onions. This fragrant mix is the foundation of the Ayam Korma’. Now, give yourself a pat on the back! =)

In a large pot, heat the oil before sautéeing the mixture. Pound the lemongrass stalks and galangal, and toss them into the pot. Remember the tip I mentioned in the Mee Bandung recipe? Ensure that you see the oil seeping through the spices, or “naik bau/terbit minyak” before proceeding to the next step. Once you’ve cleared that hurdle, your chicken is ready to dive right in! Rip the lime leaves and add it to the pot while you’re at it.

Here’s a useful rule that I abide by:

Avoid adding water when you add meat to sautéed spices. This will ensure that the meat will retain all the lovely flavours of your spice mix. Meat, especially beef and chicken, will release their juices into the spices as they cook, and forms the gravy. You’ll get tender meat and gravy that’s bursting with flavour and aroma, I promise!

Pour in half a cup of coconut milk, stir, cover the pot and let it simmer for 2 minutes. Intermittently add the rest of your coconut milk later. Give it a few minutes to simmer a little more. Once your poultry is cooked, sprinkle coriander leaves and fried shallots; cover the pot, get it off the fire and let it rest.

Serve with piping hot white rice, or if you can’t live a day without bread, why not? This is a great dish to serve during Aidilfitri too, alongside ketupat or lontong (traditional Malay rice cakes).

I wouldn’t say it’s a quick & easy recipe – let’s just say, you just have to constantly remind yourself that cooking is a labour of love (speaking from experience!). If you have a soft spot for familiar Malay home-cooked flavours, you’d know that Ayam Korma’ is undeniably good.

You’d also know that this recipe is definitely worth a try or two, yes?

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Amirah’s for all Occasions

Middle Eastern cuisine has set a strong foothold here in Singapore. And needless to say, restaurant owners are taking good advantage of this by setting up theirs at locations beyond Arab Street. Albeit, the calmness of Medina-like Arab Street still captures the true essence of dining amidst the aroma of rich spices & puffs of flavoured sheesha.

Amirah’s Grill at Bussorah Street remains a staple go-to for me.

The restaurant interior is heavily-decorated with all things authentically Arab – beautiful embroidered surahs in bright gold on a black velvet canvas, tinted glass lamps, capped swords, camel figurines and intricately woven carpets hung on walls.

Though the restaurant doesn’t exactly boast gold and porcelain sophistication like others do, their top-notch Middle Eastern-Western fusion platters just quite cuts it for me. After all, I am paying for the latter, no?

Food is justly-priced, given the portions are fit for a king. Here’s an example – For $30, you get a delectable meal that is scrumptious all through; from appetizer right up to dessert:

A plate of yummy-to-the-last-swipe hummus with warm pita bread

Chicken or mushroom soup with garlic bread

A main course platter of your choice

Hot/cold drink and Dessert

Enough with the narratives, let’s get on with the feast (for the eyes), shall we?

Hummus with Warm Pita Bread

Remember that hummus I just talked about – it is as good as hummus gets.

Smooth, mild nutty notes, fragrant olive oil and slight tanginess of lemon; warm pita makes the perfect spoon!

Soups (Chicken or Mushroom) with Garlic Bread

The soups are decent-tasting and it definitely whets your appetite for the monstrosity of a plate that comes right after.

After umpteen visits to Amirah’s Grill, these 2 main courses keep appearing in my order list. Mysterious.

1) Turkish Mixed Tenderloin Kebab

Nothing screams Mediterranean more than Kebabs. Quite frankly, this one’s for the fickle-minded who can’t decide the irresistible chicken, lamb and beef selections in the menu. Expect a mixed plate of grilled skewers of boneless chicken, grilled beef tenderloin & pieces of kofta drenched in savoury spiced sauce (read: quadruple YUM); accompanied with choice of Arabic fragrant rice or roasted potatoes.

2) Grilled Lamb Chops

If you’re a die-hard lamb fan, please don’t give this a miss. Please. The fragrant blend of spices that go into this platter does justice to the tender cuts of lamb. The well-marinated fresh lamb is soft and juicy to the bite; is cooked to absolute perfection. Based on experience, I’ve never had the lamb chops reek of any unpleasant mutton odour. Just yummy, juicy, tender chops, dipped in aromatic sauce so good, you’d request for a ladle more!

Drinks & Dessert

When you’re done lapping up your main course, down it with a glass of fresh Alexandria Mango Juice, salty or sweet Labaan, or you may even opt for teapot of hot Morroccan Mint Tea. Refreshing!

And be sure to reserve some space for dessert. You could have a scoop of good ole ice cream or the creme caramel, that is a real treat for a sweet tooth!

All in all, Amirah’s Grill is definitely a great dine-in choice for any occasion – be it bridal showers, boys night out, weekend family lunch or for birthday celebration with your loved ones.

This post was written for Muzlimbuzz (Travel&Food):

Amirah’s for all Occasions 

Muzlimbuzz is an e-magazine that caters to the modern, active, socially-engaged and spiritual Muslim. We aim to document and articulate the Muslim experience, particularly of those in Singapore and in the region. Apart from News and opinion pieces, we have daily columns that cover a wide array of topics from Health to Marriage, Spirituality to Technology, Travel & Photo Essays. In a nutshell, there’s bound to be something that would interest you here at Muzlimbuzz.

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Sides at Swensen’s

I particularly recall fond childhood memories at the former Swensen’s branch at Changi Airport Terminal 2. Yes, the one with the indoor playground at their doorstep. Parents seated at dinner tables, with their heads outstretched occasionally to look out for their kids monkeying around at the play area. Swensen’s was the chosen venue for when parents get a fatter paycheck or strictly for birthdays only because it had Fish & Chips and Banana Split – which were the luxuries then.

Swensen’s today is a far cry from being a mere Fish & Chips and Banana Split restaurant. Being a synonymous household name means they’re constantly expanding their already wide array of Western, Asian and Dessert selections to suit our expanding appetite. You get seriously spoilt for choice when you’re seated holding up the 14-odd paged menu; focusing mainly on the Main Course and Sundaes & Sweet Treats pages. Probably needs about an hour to browse from cover to cover.

You’d think to yourself – hmm now, that Breaded Chicken Meuniere is definitely a must-have and mmmm, wash it down with a generous serving of Frosted Chocolate Malt.

And as you flip the menu to look at other food selections, Mr Waiter comes by with a warm smile and utters an amicable ”Hi Sir, may I take your order now?” Your order gets noted, it gets transmitted to the kitchen and… that’s when you start flipping to look at the sides.

And by then, you’ll think you’d be too full to add on the side orders. Swensen’s sides are severely under-rated, honest! Here are the 4 M’s in that page of 12 sides that never fail to make it into my order list:

Meatballs in Black Pepper Sauce

The dish is pretty self explanatory – succulent chicken with beef meatballs basking in richly seasoned black pepper sauce with a good dollop of kid-friendly mash.

Dare you say no to meatballs?

Deep-fried Mushrooms

I had tried incessantly to recreate this delish pop-it-in-your-mouths, but they’ll never turn out just like Swensen’s. Hot and tender shiitake mushroom in a light crisp coating of batter, dipped in trusty ole tartar sauce. The initial audible crunch of batter, a whiff of earthy mushroom aroma; and as you sink your teeth in further, feel the velvety texture of the shiitake, rolling around your mouth with tangy hints of sour tartar.


Mmm! Definitely a winner, this one!

Mozarella Cheese Sticks

There is nothing more sinfully gratifying than stringing warm mozarella cheese.
And when you break into these fried crisp mozarella cheese sticks, you get just that – warm ooze of pale yellow goodness!

*Gasps* Bet your jaw just dropped and your salivary glands just went on overdrive, right there.

Baked Mussels

Still on the topic of cheese, though this time baked – are piping hot green mussels under a veneer of cheese and cream and all things magical. The shield of cheese steams mussel on the inside so you get to savour the enticing mix of salty cheese and sweetness from the tender mussel. Use a fork to nudge the base of the shell to loosen the cheesy crusts and slowly slide the whole mollusc into your mouth.

Your tastebuds would flip in excitement, I promise!

4 M’s – Meatballs, Mushroom, Mozarella and Mussels that are definite Must-haves in your next Swensen’s order! Be sure to make some space in your tummy for it!

This post was written for Muzlimbuzz (Travel&Food):

Sides at Swensen’s 

Muzlimbuzz is an e-magazine that caters to the modern, active, socially-engaged and spiritual Muslim. We aim to document and articulate the Muslim experience, particularly of those in Singapore and in the region. Apart from News and opinion pieces, we have daily columns that cover a wide array of topics from Health to Marriage, Spirituality to Technology, Travel & Photo Essays. In a nutshell, there’s bound to be something that would interest you here at Muzlimbuzz.

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